Face of Defense: Former Marine, Now a Soldier, Leads By Example

By Sgt. James Hunter, USA

Special to American Forces

Press Service  Feb. 25, 2008 – Noncommissioned officers in America’s Army have always served as the vanguards by mentoring, coaching and training troops during peacetime and war. Sgt. William Hall, 39, has always led from the front.

Throughout his life, he said, he has lived by the motto, “You lead by example.”  “Sergeant Hall is the NCO that all (sergeants) and junior enlisted should strive to be: always leading from the front and always setting the proper example,” said Staff Sgt. Charlie Collier, a Lufkin, Texas, native, who serves as Hall’s squad leader Hall said he wants to ensure his soldiers know that if they come into a sticky situation while operating in northwestern Baghdad, they can look at him and know he’s going to make the right decision.  “Soldiers watch what you do,” Hall said. “Anybody can demand respect, but few people earn respect.

If (soldiers) truly respect you by you earning their respect, they’ll follow you anywhere you’ve got to go.”  Hall, a native of Foley, Ala., serves as a team leader on the personal security detail for Col. William Hickman, commander of 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division. He described his job as “exciting, demanding and rewarding.”  

The security element travels throughout the battle space daily, escorting the commander as he meets with soldiers, Iraqi leaders and Iraqi security forces.  “We go out every day,” Hall said. “It’s pretty demanding, because we concentrate on the entire (area of operation), going everywhere in northwest Baghdad.”  Hall said the key is learning the routes through continued planning, but that at times he has to make key decisions on the spot. “You’ve got to make sure you know where you are going, because everybody is following you,” he said.

“Your main job is to get everybody where they need to be.”  Though Hall is responsible for leading the convoy, he said, he serves an even greater responsibility to his soldiers. He hopes he can make an impact on their lives.  “You make sure they are good soldiers, make sure they do what they are supposed to do, ensuring they stay alert,” he said. “You have to make sure they are there every day, maintaining their arms and their equipment.

The main objective is to complete the mission.”  However, leading by example is nothing new to Hall, who grew up in a small town along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. His town had a well-known football tradition. He was a part of that tradition since the age of 8.  In 1989, three years after graduating from high school, he joined the Marine Corps and served as an infantryman with 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines. He was a team leader and a squad leader.

Many members of his family served their nation, but none of them served as a Marine, so he decided to go against the grain.  “I always heard it was kind of hard,” Hall said. “At that point in my life, I needed something challenging.”  As a Marine, Hall earned his Ranger tab and airborne wings. “I got to experience a little bit of the Army through the Marine Corps,” he said.  He worked himself to the rank of sergeant, and in 1995 he decided to leave the Corps. He had orders to become a drill instructor, but his father was ailing from heart disease and he wanted to spend what time he had left with him, Hall explained.  

In the meantime, Hall worked as a sod farmer and in the lumber business, but the passion for the military never left him, he said.  “I was an operations manager in a lumber company for several years — made good money — but I had a desire to serve my country again, (to) come to Iraq and be a part of history,” he said. “I felt like I would have cheated my life if I didn’t come over here and at least gave my effort in the battle against terrorism.”  

Since Sept. 11, 2001, Hall had wanted to rejoin the military’s ranks, but family and job commitments stood in the way, until one day when he said, “Hey, I don’t want to miss out,” the sergeant recalled.  Hall joined the National Guard and served with the 20th Special Forces Group. He went through the selection course, but even after completing the 21-day course, was not selected. He didn’t see this as a weakness, he said, but rather as a sign.

 He said he felt as if he still had the mental and physical capabilities to make it through, so why not go active duty?  “Sometimes in life you have to do something that makes you feel better inside,” Hall said. “I was on my way to Desert Storm and it ended, so I was like, ‘Man, I missed out.’ I said, ‘Enough’s enough.'”  Six weeks after leaving the National Guard for the active-duty Army, Hall was in Iraq.  “This is what it’s all about. Everyone’s got to do their time and do the right thing,” he said with conviction. “Not too many people can say they came to Iraq and defended their country.”  It was a sudden decision, but Hall said he always has had his family’s support. Hall and his wife have six children, with another on the way.

His wife had just graduated from nursing school and was still in the process of beginning her career, but he knew whatever he chose to do, his wife and children would back him up 100 percent, he said.  When Hall gets the rare opportunity to kick his feet up and relax, he thinks about his wife and his unborn son, and he counts his blessings, he said.  “(God has) let me do what I’ve always wanted to do,” he said. “I’ve always had the desire to be in the military.”  

(Army Sgt. James Hunter serves in Multinational Division Baghdad with the 101st Airborne Division’s 2nd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office.)  

The June Newsletter of Hi Tech Criminal Justice support the production of the article.

Leadership

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Austin to New York

February 25, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website added one police officer from the Austin Police Department and two from the NYPD.

 Jimmie Davenport is a 18 year member of the Austin Police Department (Texas). He has spent 14 years in the K9 Unit. His duties have included setting up advanced training within the his K9 Unit for new and experienced handlers. Officer Jimmie Davenport also has been a SWAT K9 for ten years and has helped design the SWAT K9 program currently in use. Officer Davenport has also written K9 training columns for SWAT magazine, Police K9 Magazine and International Police Working Dog Association.  Jimmie Davenport is the author of Run, But You Can’t Hide. 

According to the description of Run, But You Can’t Hide, it “is author Jimmie Davenport, Jr.’s, wry advice to criminals faced with apprehension by a police K9. In his more than twelve years a K9 handler, including with a SWAT team, Davenport has found his confidence in his dogs more than rewarded, and his engaging account of his experiences with Stuka and Ammo reveal the training, dedication, and determination that goes into forging an effective K9 team. The drama of the stories he relates is complimented by Davenport’s genuine affection for his canine partners, and the detailed narrative he has crafted draws readers into this adrenaline-fueled world, leaving us with a new appreciation for the abilities of those animals trained to assist law enforcement.” 

Robert McGuire was appointed commissioner of the NYPD in 1978 and served for almost six years; making him one of the longest serving commissioners during the modern era. Robert McGuire is the author of In the Line of Fire: A Commisioner’s Views on Cops and Crime. 

Craig Meissner is a sergeant with the New York City Police Department.  He worked patrol, as a robber investigator, patrol sergeant and training officer.  Sergeant Craig Meissner has written extensively about officer safety issues and is the author of Disguised Weapons: The Law Enforcemnt Guide To Covert Guns, Knives, And Other Weapons

 Police-Writers.com now hosts 859 police officers (representing 383 police departments) and their 1805  police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.  

Contact Information:

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA

editor@police-writers.com

909.599.7530

Over 1800 Police Books

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website added three NYPD authors who brought the total number of books by police officers to over 1800. 

Steven  Gure is a former New York City Police Department police officer and the author of Life: A True Story.  According to the book description, “His is a remarkable story.  Born into a family of wealthy European Jews, Steven found his life filled with horror and upheaval after the Nazi occupation of his native Lithuania when he was five years old.  All of his family except his older sister, Ann, perished in the Holocaust.  Eventually, Steven and Ann managed to make their way to the United States, where further insecurities awaited in the form of a series of foster homes, orphanages, and the like. With determination and perseverance, however, Steve managed to survive and even to prosper.  He served in the military, worked his way through college, got married and had children, and joined the New York City police force. 

Stephen Leinen is a former New York City Police Department lieutenant.  After leaving the NYPD he became a professor of sociology at Manattan College.  Ulitmately, in 2006 he retired as the Chair, Department of Sociology, Manhattan College.  Stephen Leinen is the author of Gay Cops and of Black Police, Whie Society 

According to Publisher’s Weekly, “In the first book-length study of gay police officers, Leinen, a sociologist, author of Black Police, White Society and a former NYPD lieutenant, reports on the coping and surviving strategies of 41 homosexual New York City police officers, both male and female. The author, who is heterosexual and was on the force when he began this study, attended Gay Officers Action League meetings, dances and gay pride parades. He describes the tense passage from being a law enforcement agent who potentially threatens the secrecy of gay officers still in the closet to being a researcher observing their lifestyle.” 

William Majeski had a 21 year career with the New York City Police Department where retired as a Detective. His law enforcement expertise encompasses a vast array of criminal and internal investigations, from Homicides through to Political Corruption. During his tenure as an NYPD Detective, William Majeski  focused on complex Investigations. Periodically, he took on other assignments; serving as a Panel Member of the Civilian Complaint Board, as a Delegate for the Detective Endowment Association and was selected as a Committee Member to evaluate current and develop new departmental investigative procedures.   

William Majeski has a BS Degree from John Jay College of Criminal Justice and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy. Over the years he has successfully completed numerous complex investigations, becoming a recognized specialist in areas of corporate litigation, white-collar crime, internal corruption, personal solutions and interviewing techniques. He developed the Power Interview. William Majeski is the President of Majeski Associates Inc., an Investigative Firm in operation since 1988, creating solutions and serving the needs of clients worldwide.

He is the co-editor of Corporate Investigations and the author of The Lie Detection Book.  Police-Writers.com now hosts 856 police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1802  police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.  

Contact Information:

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA

editor@police-writers.com

909.599.7530

Criminal Justice Authors

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website added three NYPD authors who made significant contributions to the field of criminal justice. 

Joseph Fink’s 30 year law enforcement career with the New York City Police Department culminated with his retirement at the rank of Deputy Inspector.  Joseph Fink received his education at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and would return there after his retirement to serve as a professor of Police Science.   Joseph Fink is the co-author of The Community and the Police: Conflict or Cooperation. 

Lloyd George Sealy became a New York City Police Officer in 1942.  While working full-time he earned a BA degree in sociology and a law degree from Brooklyn law School.  In 1962, Lloyd George Sealy was promoted to the rank of captain and he ultimately became the first African American New York City Police Officer to take command of a precinct in Harlem.  In 1966, he became the first African American Chief Inspector and the first African American commander of the Brooklyn North Patrol Area. 

In 1969, Lloyd George Sealy left the NYPD to become an Associate Professor of Law and Police Science at John Jay College.  Later, he would serve three terms as the chair of that department at John Jay College.  Lloyd George Sealy is the author of The Problems of Black Police Executives and Minority Recruitment for the State of Tennessee, Department of Safety; and, the co-author of The Community and the Police: Conflict or Cooperation. 

Robert Gallati, a depression era lawyer, turned to police work as an alternative to hard times.  When he began the police academy, he already had a law degree from Fordham University and a Master’s from St. John’s University.  By 1962, he had risen to the rank of Assistant Chief Inspector and was named the NYPD Chief of Planning.   

In 1964, he took a leave of absence from the NYPD to become the first director of the New York State Identification and Intelligence System.  For the next eight years he developed the computerized fingerprint system that would become the model for the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  Robert Gallati returned to the NYPD, retiring in 1973.  He then served as a Deputy Police Commissioner in Mount Vernon (New York) and later as a the Chief of Police for the Brockton Police Department (Massachusetts).  Robert Gallati died in 1996. 

He is the co-author of Introduction to Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice and co-author of Criminal Interrogation; and, the author of Introduction to Private Security and A plan for the Utilization of Lieutenants as Platoon Commanders in Selected Precincts in the Police Department, city of New York. 

Police-Writers.com now hosts 853 police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1798  police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.  Contact Information:Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPAeditor@police-writers.com909.599.7530

850 Police Officers

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  With the addition of three NYPD cops, the website now lists 850 police officers from nearly 400 departments.  The NYPD cops total 119 authors. 

Retired New York City Police Department bomb squad detective Kenneth Dudonis co-authored The Counterterrorism Handbook: Tactics, Procedures, and Techniques with Frank Bolz.  According to the book description, the “third edition is an invaluable resource for those who recognize that preparation is the best defense in the War on Terror. Revised and expanded to reflect information obtained since the September 11th attacks, this latest edition provides an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and techniques required to counter terrorism as it exists today.”  

A 19th Century New York City Police Department detective, Philip Farley, published Criminals Of America: Or Tales Of The Lives Of Thieves, Enabling Everyone To Be His Own Detective.   

 Robert Fasone received a degree in Liberal Arts at Kingsborough Community College and graduated cum laude with a degree in English from Brooklyn College in 1987. His first job had little to do with his degree in English. He was hired as a collector and then promoted to a credit analyst at Security Pacific Bank in New York. He worked for a short time at the Belding Hemingway Company as a credit analyst before becoming a New York City Police Officer. Robert worked as a cop in Manhattan South; primarily in the 1st and 9th Precincts. Robert and his family moved to South Florida, where he worked at American Express Travel Related Services for fourteen years, most recently as their Regulatory Compliance Manager in American Express’ Ft. Lauderdale offices. 

Robert Fasone is the author of two novels: Bread Upon the Water and A Chase After Wind. 

According to the description of A Chase After Wind, “Neil “Momma” Mia was a lieutenant in the NYPD spearheading the narcotics war against Manual Cordova. His uneasy alliance with Don Gino Armenti led him to defy direct orders to save the Don’s son from Cordova. Momma did his job too well, and it all became personal when Cordova ordered the brutal murder of Mia’s wife. Neil threw down his badge and went on a bloody rampage seeking vengeance, leaving a trail of dead bodies in his wake. Cordova sent a terrifying message: Christy Mia was next. Momma had to save his daughter, and with the assistance of Don Armenti, began a life on the run. Five years later Cordova took the one precious thing Neil Mia lived for…or did he…? The only way for Momma to find out was to pursue those responsible, not only to save Christy’s life, but to redeem his own…and discover the truth.” 

Police-Writers.com now hosts 850 police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1792  police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.  Contact Information:Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPAeditor@police-writers.com909.599.7530

NYPD Academics to Gunfighters

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website added three NYPD cops who have looked at law enforcement from the street as well as from the classroom.  

Jim Cirillo was a member of the New York City Police Department Stake-Out Squad. According to one biographer, “his job was to confront the worst in the criminal world. He lived through no less than seventeen separate shootouts. He was involved in many more armed confrontations. He later moved on to U.S. Customs. After retirement from law enforcement, Jim Cirillo took up writing. His book, Guns, Bullets, And Gunfights: Lessons And Tales From A Modern-Day Gunfighter is a compilation of articles he wrote over the years.  

According to the book description of Guns, Bullets, And Gunfights: Lessons And Tales From A Modern-Day Gunfighter, “As member of the NYPD, Jim Cirillo survived more gunfights than Wild West legends Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson and “Wild Bill” Hickok combined. Learn what it takes to survive a real gunfight from someone who’s been in many – Jim Cirillo, top gun in the New York City Police Department stakeout unit. Read about the stress and intensity of an actual shoot-out and how to maximize your training, ammo and weapons to prevail.”  

John Eterno has been employed by the New York City Police Department for over 20 years. As Commanding Officer of the Mapping Support Unit, he makes policy recommendations and handles sensitive assignments for the Deputy Commissioner of Strategic Initiatives and the Assistant Commissioner of Programs and Policies. He is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Sociology at Queens College in New York. He has written book chapters and journal articles on various topics within the field of policing. John Eterno is the author of Policing within the Law: A Case Study of the New York City Police Department.  

According to the description of Policing within the Law : A Case Study of the New York City Police Department, “at a time when police abuses and errors make the headlines, it is important to understand just what goes into the decisions that police make when they are confronted with various crime scenarios in the line of duty. Required to respond within the law, many officers are able to respond in a legal manner to crime situations in which court decisions are written clearly and with easily applied guidelines. But what happens when those decisions and laws are written in a way that invites interpretation and varies from situation to situation? Based on a case study of New York City police officers, this important volume analyzes how officers contend with often-ambiguous laws in the face of specific crime scenarios. In addition, the author explores other influences on police decision making, including officer characteristics and attitudes, and makes policy recommendations in an effort to encourage the reinforcement of legal guidelines so that the rights of individuals are appropriately balanced with the duty to control crime.”  

Frank Day retired from the New York City Police Department after 21 years of service.  In May 1953, he joined the staff of the Southern Police Institute where he became the Associate Director of Training.  He is the co-author, A. C. Germann (formerly of the Los Angeles Police Department) of Introduction to Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice.   As of 1988, that book had gone into its 33rd printing.   Frank Day is the author of Criminal Law and Society.  

Police-Writers.com now hosts 847 police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1789  police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.  Contact Information:Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPAeditor@police-writers.com909.599.7530