Hunter Adopted by Hopkins

July 29, 2008, (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  James H. Lilley, the Police-Writer.com Author of the Year (2008), has had his book, The Eyes of the Hunter, adopted by Johns Hopkins University.

 James H. Lilley is a former Marine and Police Sergeant with the Howard County Police Department (Maryland). He worked in the Uniformed Patrol Division, Criminal Investigations Division, Forensic Services (CSI) and Drug Enforcement Division. His Street Drug Unit was featured in the book “Undercover” by Hans Halberstadt and published by Simon and Schuster. Some of his awards include The Medal of Valor, Four Bronze Stars, Four Unit Citations and the Governor’s Citation. He is also an 8th Degree Black Belt in Shorin Ryu Karate.  James Lilley is the author of seven books: A Question of Honor; The Eyes of the Hunter; The Far Side of the Bridge; Just Retribution; A Miracle for Tony Clements; Death Knocks Twice, and, A Tony Clements Christmas Miracle.

 According to Sheldon Greenberg, Ph.D. (Associate Dean, School of Education, Johns Hopkins University), “The Eyes of the Hunter will be used as a text for the Communications course in the Master of Science in Intelligence Analysis degree program at Johns Hopkins University.”  Dr. Sheldon continued that Lilley’s book will help the students “focus on creativity and critical thinking, research, understanding the audience, and formulating meaningful written documents.”

 The course The Eyes of the Hunter will be used in is “Communications: Fact, Opinion, Significance, and Consequence.”  According to the course description, “Within the intelligence community, findings are of little value unless they are communicated well.  Dissemination of findings is essential to the success of any analysis or research.  Students learn to deliver written, oral, and visual presentations for maximum effect by considering factors such as intended outcome, timing, structure, and method.  Working individually and in small groups, students address issues such as lack of time to plan and prepare, unfamiliarity with the customer (end user of analytical documents), disruption and change, and coping with the unexpected. Students receive ongoing feedback on their communication style and effectiveness. 

 The ability to justify and present an analytical conclusion in clear, succinct prose is essential to supplying policy makers with information they need to formulate decisions.  Students consider traditional and innovative methods of intelligence writing and briefing, focusing on the difference between fact and opinion. Students prepare written reports and presentations on a variety of topics and, in doing so, construct narratives, establish project credibility, convey recommendations, and reinforce key messages.”

 Police-Writers.com now hosts 1029 police officers (representing 431 police departments) and their  2189 criminal justice books in 33 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Face of Defense: Former Stunt Man Makes Leap to Ministry

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By Army Spc. Justin Snyder

Special to American Forces Press Service

 July 21, 2008 – Army Chaplain (Capt.) Eric Light gives a weekly sermon and is available for counseling whenever a soldier might need it. But he is not your ordinary chaplain. “When I was in college, money was kind of hard to come by, so I became a stunt guy to pay for college,” said Light, who serves with the 101st Airborne Division’s 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team.

 In the late 1980s, Hollywood was experiencing a writers’ strike. Feeling the pinch from a lack of work there, some of the companies in show business took their shows on the road.

 “A guy who was a stuntman moved into town and would put on a Wild West show while trying to obtain the contracts for movies when they came through,” said Light, a native of Kingspen, Tenn., and a graduate of East Tennessee State University. “We happened to go to the same church, and he took me under his wing, teaching me the ropes.”

 Light began working at the Wild West show, which led to performing a few stunts for television shows such as “Unsolved Mysteries” and “Rescue 911.” The work on those shows paid most of his way through college.

 Following college graduation in 1993, Light quit the stunt man life and began what he said he believed to be his true calling, ministry. He started working with college students in a counselor-like role at the University of Michigan, then at the University of California State in Fullerton.

 After the university’s program diminished due to a lack of funding, Light found himself without a job. He struggled to find employment for a few years, eventually distributing a resume with the hope someone would contact him for work.  He finally got a call, but from an unexpected place: the Army.

 “I got a call from a retired Army chaplain asking if I’d be interested in being a chaplain in the military. I told him, ‘No,’ because I wanted to work with college-age kids from 18 to 25 years old.” Light said.

 “He kind of laughed at me after that statement, because soldiers of that age make up a lot of the Army. After that, the light bulb came on, and I knew this was what God was calling me to do.”

 Over the next 15 months, he lost 50 pounds to meet the Army‘s weight standards and headed off to basic chaplains training. After graduation, he was assigned to the 1-187th Infantry Regiment, where he received word that he would be deploying to Iraq.

 “Getting deployed was never a problem for me,” Light said. “All of the active-duty people in my class were getting deployed, so I knew it was a matter of time. What good would I be if I could not deploy with the soldiers I am here for?”

 Light said he constantly is learning and trying to improve himself as a better chaplain during his first deployment. Recently, he had an experience that served as a confidence booster.

 “I was sitting outside reading when the company commander came walking by and told me I was a good chaplain,” he recalled. “For someone outside of the Chaplain Corps to randomly come up to me and notice what I was doing, that really proved to me that being here was the right thing and that I was doing a good job.”

 While he isn’t outside the wire all the time, Light said, he knows his job is equally as important. He must be there not only for the soldiers who are deployed, but also for their families back at home.

 “Never in our nation’s history have families had to give up so much,” he said. “While I’m not out there on the front line fighting, it’s my job to be there for [soldiers] when they come back. If I can help prepare these soldiers to go back to their families, I’m doing my part.”

 (Army Spc. Justin Snyder serves in the 101st Airborne Division’s 3rd Brigade Combat Team public Affairs Office.)

Schools as Terror Targets

On August 6, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature an interview of John Giduck on the Beslan School Seige. According to Esquire Magazine, “On the first day of school in 2004, a Chechen terrorist group struck the Russian town of Beslan. Targeting children, they took more than eleven hundred hostages.  John Giduck is the author of Terror at Beslan: A Russian Tragedy with Lessons for America’s Schools.

 Program Date: August 6, 2008

Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific

Topic: Schools as Terror Targets

Listen Live:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/08/07/Schools-as-Terror-Targets

 About the Guest

John Giduck has a Bachelor’s Degree from Penn State and a law degree from the University of Denver.  He also earned a Master’s Degree in International Affairs, specializing in Russian studies, from the University of Colorado, which included completion of the Russian Culture and Language Program at St. Petersburg State University in Russia.  He has traveled extensively throughout Russia and the former Soviet Union, training with Russia’s elite Special Forces units for more than 10 years; and, is a certified instructor in Russian Special Forces hand to hand combat. 

 John Giduck has trained state and federal law enforcement officers and agents, including DEA, FBI, US Marshal’s Service, and SWAT teams throughout the US.  He has served as a consultant on various international and terrorism subjects, and as a Russian Organized Crime instructor, for numerous federal and state agencies.  He currently devotes his professional time to the Archangel Group, providing anti-terrorism consulting and training to U.S. law enforcement, government and military, part of which includes John serving as a civilian contract U.S. Army Special Forces hand-to-hand combat and firearms instructor.  As well, he holds several black belts, is a multiple inductee into international martial arts halls of fame, and is a former U.S. national weightlifting champion.

 John Giduck is a lifetime member of the Special Operations Association, Rocky Mountain Tactical Team Association, Russian Special Forces Brotherhood of the Red Beret Association, and is a lifetime executive member of the British Professional Bodyguard Association.  He is a graduate of the FBI Citizen’s Academy and holds the highest level expert certification in Homeland Security through the American College of Forensic Examiners International, and is a former member of the Executive Advisory Board of the American College of Homeland Security and Police Marksman magazine.  He is a current member of the Advisory Board of the College of Disaster Medicine and Management of Philadelphia University. In addition to other published materials and articles on terrorism, Russian organized crime and close quarters tactics, finished his book, Terror at Beslan: A Russian Tragedy With Lessons for America’s Schools, in 2005.  His second book, co-authored with Green Beret Sergeant Major John Anderson, entitled The Green Beret In You: Living With Total Commitment To Family, Career, Sports and Life, was published in late 2007.

 As part of his work with Archangel, John Giduck is also a scuba, tactical diving and CQB instructor, and teaches terrorist-hostage negotiations, narco-terrorism, terrorism and global organized crime, and Russian organized crime courses.  He is now working on his doctoral dissertation on the global expansion of radical Islam through King’s College of London.

 About the Watering Hole

The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life.  Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

 About the Host

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years.  He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant.  He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University.  He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership.  Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One.  He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

 Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.

 http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/08/07/Schools-as-Terror-Targets

 Program Contact Information

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA

editor@police-writers.com

909.599.7530

Homicide Investigations

On August 1, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Lieutenant-Commander Vernon J. Geberth, M.S., M.P.S. (NYPD, ret.) on homicide investigations.

 Program Date: August 1, 2008

Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific

Topic: Homicide Investigations

Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

 About the Guest

Vernon J. Geberth, M.S., M.P.S. is a retired Lieutenant-Commander of the New York City Police Department with over forty years of law enforcement experience.  He has personally investigated, supervised, assessed, researched and consulted on over 8000 death investigations. In addition, Commander Vernon J. Geberth has been the recipient of more than 60 awards for bravery and exceptional police work and is a member of the New York City Police Department’s Honor Legion.

 Commander Vernon J. Geberth has a Master’s Degree of Professional Studies (M.P.S.) C.W. Post College, Long Island University and a second Master’s of Science Degree in Psychology (M.S.), California Coast University, Santa Ana, California. He earned his Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) at Iona College in New Rochelle, New York and he is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia 119th Session, (1979).  Commander Vernon J. Geberth is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS).

 Commander Geberth, is the author of Practical Homicide Investigation: Tactics, Procedures, and Forensic Techniques, which is now in it’s Fourth Edition and is recognized in the law enforcement field as “The Bible of Homicide Investigation” and the Practical Homicide Investigation Checklist and Field Guide, which is considered by professionals as an essential prerequisite in conducting proficient death inquiries.  He is also the author of Sex-Related Homicide and Death Investigation: Practical and Clinical Perspectives, which is considered the framework textbook on sex-related murder.

 In addition, he created and serves as the Series Editor of Practical Aspects of Criminal and Forensic Investigations for Taylor & Francis CRC Press, LLC Inc. in Boca Raton, Florida and has proposed and edited over forty publications within this series.

 About the Watering Hole

The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life.  Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

 About the Host

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years.  He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant.  He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University.  He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership.  Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One.  He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

 Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

 Program Contact Information

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA

editor@police-writers.com

909.599.7530

Face of Defense: Commo Specialist ‘Lives Dream’ on Iraq Deployment

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Special to American Forces Press Service

 July 18, 2008 – Army Sgt. Jason Ruckman had a desire to be part of something that would make a difference. Six years ago, he joined the Army to whet his appetite for adventure, and he has never looked back. “Since I was in middle school, I’ve always wanted to wear a uniform; I thought they were cool-looking,” the Orlando, Fla., native said.

 It helped to have a family military history that dated back to World War I, in which his great-grandfather fought. Ruckman’s grandfather served in World War Two, and his father in Vietnam. “They always seemed kind of proud about it, so I wanted to do something right for my family,” he said. “This was the best thing I could think of.”

 A 2002 graduate of William R. Boone High School in Orlando, Ruckman joined the Army later that year. He graduated advanced individual training in 2003 as a signal support systems specialist.

 Now, “I’ve got the uniform covered; it’s fun to put on. I wanted to do ‘hooah,’ high-speed stuff,” he said. “(The recruiter) told me my (job) would put me alongside some sort of a commander, running around with a radio doing high-speed stuff. … That never happened.”

 Well, it happened; just a little later than he expected.

 Ruckman served as his battalion commander’s radio-telephone operator during his first deployment to Iraq in 2005. His recruiter’s promise came to fruition as he traveled with his commander around the battlefield. He said he felt more at home out there than working communications issues on the base.

 “I like going out on missions and being in the thick of things. I felt more like I was serving a purpose if I were outside the wire,” said the 26-year-old, who is now assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division.

 He said he doesn’t look down upon those whose jobs don’t require them to leave the operating base. “Every (job) in the Army is vital in some way, shape or form, [but] I feel like I have more of a purpose outside the wire than inside the wire.

 “I don’t feel like my full potential will be utilized by staying on the [base],” he added.

 Staying put is not something Ruckman has to worry about these days. As a brigade commander’s driver, he travels the roads of Iraq on an almost-daily basis. He doesn’t take that lightly.

 With two Purple Hearts under his belt, Ruckman knows well the potential dangers of duty in a combat zone. He reluctantly recounted the circumstances surrounding his injuries.

 The first, in December 2003, was a result of a suicide car bomber in Tal Afar. The would-be assassin attempted to breach the entry control point of the battalion’s compound with 1,000 pounds of explosives in his vehicle. No one was killed, but 67 were injured.

 “It was a real mess,” Ruckman remembered, shaking his head as though willing the memory to go away. He walked away with wounds to the face and hands from shards of flying glass.

 His second Purple Heart came after an improvised explosive device detonated at a city council building north of Beiji in October 2005. This time he had shrapnel wounds and a broken hand.

 Ruckman said the fact that things could have been much worse doesn’t escape him. “I’m thankful (things) turned out the way they did,” he said. “It’s kind of tough to talk about the Purple Hearts because I look at some guys … whose physical appearance and capabilities have been impaired for the rest of their lives, and I just got a few scars on me.

 “So I don’t like to make a big deal about it because there are those who got Purple Hearts … whose lives were changed and affected by it a lot more than mine.”

 He said his close calls have given him a definite respect for the dangers soldiers face. He said he’s not afraid to face those dangers head-on in the course of performing his duty, but some fear is healthy.

 “If you’re not fearful in some way, … I think there’s something wrong,” he said matter-of-factly. “I think a little dose of fear or nervousness is normal. I go out knowing that I have to [go out], and I can see the bigger picture.”

 The “bigger picture” as far as Ruckman is concerned is making sure elements of the command group get where they need to go safely and without incident. This deployment has been relatively uneventful for the adventure seeker, and that’s okay with him.

 Uncertain as to whether he’ll go for a fourth deployment to Iraq or look for a job as an instructor, Ruckman said he’s leaving his options open right now. “I’m not sure what’s next; there are so many possibilities out there,” he said. “I really enjoy teaching younger soldiers how to tap into their full capabilities, to watch them rise up and become leaders.”

 With a family bursting at its seams with pride, Ruckman said he has a wonderful support system on which he can depend. “My dad … is really proud of what I do; my sister loves it, she is both proud and petrified,” he said with a laugh. “She shows me off … when I go home. I’m like one of her heroes because of what I do.”

 His mom is somewhat torn, too, because of the dangers he faces in Iraq. But he said his mom is beside herself with pride. “She always calls me an honorable man,” he said.

 His older brother is a heavy-wheel mechanic in the Army Reserves, so the tradition continues.

 Ruckman initially joined the Army for four years, but he has re-enlisted for five additional years. He said he’s having fun now — “living the dream,” as so many soldiers like to say.

 “For a commo guy to be able to go on numerous cordon and knocks, air-assault missions, and patrols is just my dream come true,” he said, looking like a kid at Christmas. “I like being able to do a lot of what the infantry guys do.”

 Not yet willing to commit to being a “lifer” in the Army, Ruckman admitted he can’t think of himself in another profession. “I’m almost afraid of getting out because I wouldn’t know what to do,” he said with a shrug. “It probably will end up being my career.”

 (Army Sgt. 1st Class Kerensa Hardy is assigned to the public Affairs Office of 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division.)

Police Search and Seizure

On July 25, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with David Waksman on Police Search and Seizure.

 Program Date: July 25, 2008

Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific

Topic: Police Search and Seizure

Listen Live:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/26/Police-Search-and-Seizure

 About the Guest

David Waksman, J.D., is a nationally known homicide prosecutor with vast experience in trying violent offenders. David Waksman has toiled 32 years in the criminal courts of Miami, Florida, after working the mean streets of The South Bronx for six years as a police officer and rising to the rank of sergeant in the New York Police Department.  He may have tried more first-degree murder cases than any other American prosecutor.

 David Waksman‘s career as a prosecutor began under the legendary Richard Gerstein.  He also worked eighteen years as an assistant to America’s most popular, and longest serving Attorney General, Janet Reno, when she served as Miami’s top prosecutor.  During that time period he tried over eighty-five homicide cases to juries, including twenty in which the death penalty was sought.

 David Waksman, not content to fight his battles in Miami-Dade County, has been teaching the cops of America the law and procedures they need to combat violent crimes in their communities.  Since 1988 he has taught a monthly seminar on homicide investigation for the Southern Police Institute (University of Louisville) in various locations (22 states, 34 cities) across the country.  He also teaches new detectives, crime scene technicians, medical examiners and forensic investigators at the nationally renowned Dade County Medical Examiner’s Police-Medical Investigation of Death seminar.  He has taught classes (one a Fourth Amendment seminar) at the University of Miami School of Law and at several colleges in the South Florida area.  Local police departments continually call upon David Waksman to teach refresher courses and in-service training to their investigators.  David Waksman is the author of the Search and Seizure Handbook.

 About the Watering Hole

The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life.  Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

 About the Host

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years.  He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant.  He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University.  He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership.  Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One.  He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

 Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/26/Police-Search-and-Seizure

 Program Contact Information

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA

editor@police-writers.com

909.599.7530

Become a Private Investigator

On July 18, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Jimmie Mesis on how to become a private investigator.

 Program Date: July 18, 2008

Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific

Topic: Become a Private Investigator

Listen Live:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/19/Become-a-Private-Investigator

 About the Guest

Jimmie Mesis is probably one the most recognized and respected private investigators throughout the United States and abroad. For the last 28 years, he has created and sold numerous companies related to the field of investigations including several investigative agencies that have generated millions of dollars in revenue.   He currently owns a marketing consulting firm, several Internet based companies including his latest venture, PI Gear, a discount surveillance equipment company.

 However, he and his investigator wife, Rosemarie are best known as the owners of PI Magazine, the only international trade publication of private investigators. In less than 4 years the magazine has grown from less than 1,000 readers to over 30,000 readers with subscribers in 22 countries.  Jimmie Mesis is the recipient of numerous awards including, Investigator of the Year Award, Speaker of the Year, and the recipient of the Hal Lipset Award for Investigative Excellence presented to him by the World Association of Detectives.

 About the Watering Hole

The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life.  Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

 About the Host

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years.  He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant.  He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University.  He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership.  Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One.  He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

 

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

 Program Contact Information

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA

editor@police-writers.com

909.599.7530