Rawls, Barlow and Bartlett

April 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website added three law enforcement officials from Florida.

 Neal Rawls was a sergeant with the Delray Police Department (Florida).  Neal Rawls received 14 commendations, led a tactical unit for in-progress crimes, was civil defense liaison for his department, and Public Information Officer.  Additionally, Neal Rawls was an instructor at the Palm Beach County Police Academy and Palm Beach Community College, teaching firearms; pursuit and defensive driving; surveillance; arrest, search and seizure; and the use of personal defensive weapons.

 Neal Rawls holds a BA in criminology and a Master’s Criminal Justice.  In 1981, Neal Rawls went into private industry as a personal bodyguard for a corporate executive.  He was promoted to director of security for the corporation, charged with designing and developing security protocols for company offices worldwide.  Neal Rawls is the author of Be Alert, Be Aware, Have a Plan: The Complete Guide to Personal Security. 

 David Barlow began his criminal justice career as a correctional officer in South Carolina.  In 1981, he became a deputy sheriff for the Richland County Sheriff’s Department (South Carolina).  In 1983, he joined the Florida State University Police Department as a Law Enforcement Officer I.  In 1987, David Barlow left the practitioner side of the field and began to pursue an academic career, beginning as a instructor of criminal justice at the South Carolina State College.  Today, he is a professor and dean, College of Basic and Applied Sciences, Fayetteville State University. 

 David Barlow has a BS in the Administration of Justice and Sociology, an MS in Criminology and a Ph.D. in Criminology and Criminal Justice.  David Barlow is the co-author of Police in America: Classic and Contemporary Readings, Police in a Multicultural Society: An American Story, and Classics in Policing.

 Derrick Bartlett is a sniper and trainer on the Fort Lauderdale Police Department SWAT Team. He has been a police officer for over twenty-five years. Twenty-two of those years he has been assigned to special operations teams. He is also the Managing Director of Snipercraft, Inc., which is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the education and enhancement to police sniper skills. He has held sniper seminars and schools for more than 500 police agencies nationwide.  Derrick Bartlett is the author of Snipercraft: The Art of Police Sniping and Staring at the Crosshairs.

 Richard Morey, Coordinator, Law Enforcement Programs, SFCC Criminal Justice Academy said of Staring at the Crosshairs, “Derrick’s contributions prove how one person can make a difference. He has made a difference, and, perhaps more importantly, he has instilled in others the desire to make a difference. He is passionate about training, and it shows in his teaching, and through his guidance. Today, snipers are a stronger community because of people like Derrick Bartlett.  Derrick has put the word “sniper” back in our job description, and we can be proud.”

 Police-Writers.com now hosts 990 police officers (representing 415 police departments) and their 2096 police books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Pelkington, Alexander and Erler

April 22, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website added three law enforcement officials from the State of Florida.

 Chief Joe Pelkington’s 43 year career in law enforcement began with the Tampa Police Department, in 1960.  As a member of the Tampa Police Department, he commanded the Patrol Division, Detective Division and the Selective Enforcement Bureau.  In 1985, he retired from the Tampa Police Department as a Deputy Police Chief.  He then began an 18 year career with the Treasure Island Police Department (Florida) as their chief of police. Joe Pelkington is the author of Shades of Blue.

 According to the book description of Shades of Blue, “The early 1960’s were the years that segregation started to wane and civil disobedience tested police leadership. The police had broad discretion on the use of force including deadly force. Society demanded and pressured police to exhibit restraint and improve professional conduct. Police violence, tragedy, courage, dedication, compassion and misconduct are all revealed in this book. There are stories of police responding to dangerous encounters, humorous cases involving humans, animals and about police officers themselves.”

 Dr. John Alexander is a senior fellow with the Joint Special Operations University. For more than a decade, Dr. John Alexander has been a leading advocate for the development of non-lethal weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, he organized and chaired six major conferences on non-lethal weapons, served as a U.S. delegate to four NATO studies on the topic. He wrote many of the seminal articles on non-lethal weapons and was a member of the National Research Council Committee for Assessment of Non-Lethal Weapons Science and Technology.

 Dr. John Alexander entered the U.S. Army as a private in 1956 and rose through the ranks to sergeant first class. He later attended Officer Candidate School and retired as a colonel of Infantry in 1988. During his varied career, he held many key positions in special operations, intelligence, and research and development. Academically, he holds an MA and a Ph.D. from Walden University. He has attended the Anderson School of Management, the Sloan School of Management, and the Kennedy School of Government.

Earlier in his life, Dr. John Alexander worked five years as a deputy sheriff for the Dade County Sheriff’s Department. He is the author of Winning the War: Advanced Weapons, Strategies, and Concepts for the Post-9/11 World and a co-author of The Warrior’s Edge and Future War: Non-Lethal Weapons in Twenty-First-Century Warfare.

 According to Publisher’s Weekly, Future War: Non-Lethal Weapons in Twenty-First-Century Warfare, “In a thoughtful examination of the future of military doctrine, Alexander takes a hard look at what options might be available to the American military in a world in which the rules of warfare have changed. Non-lethal weapons, he argues, will become more important for both political and practical reasons. Americans have grown increasingly aware of and sensitive to all casualties on any side in even the most just wars.”

 Bob Erler, an ex-Green Beret, became a police officer Hollywood Police Department. One day he came home and found his wife and son had left him. Suffering from the effects of a high speed pursuit crash, Bob Erler went into depression.  Later, on a day off, he came across a lady and her 12-year old daughter with no place to stay. He invited them to stay in his trailer but once there the lady told him she would call the police chief and tell him Bob was entertaining two women in his trailer unless he gave her $75.

 Bob Erler shot the lady and her daughter dumping their bodies and calling the police station and saying “I’ve just shot two people, please catch me.” From that day the suspect was known as “The Catch Me Killer.”  The next day he was assigned to investigate his own homicides. Bob Erler is the author of They Called Me the Catch Me Killer.

 Police-Writers.com now hosts 987 police officers (representing 413 police departments) and their 2090 police books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Face of Defense: Air Force Photographer Becomes Marine Infantryman

By Marine Corps Cpl. Ryan Tomlinson

Special to American Forces Press Service

 April 28, 2008 – A hard-fought transition brought one Marine from shooting photos to shooting rifles. Cpl. Andrew M. Oquendo, a scout with Company D, 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, Regimental Combat Team 5, went from photographer with the U.S. Air Force to infantryman in the U.S. Marine Corps.

 The 22-year-old infantryman from Paterson, N.J., joined the Air Force after struggling to make payments on his tuition at Delaware State University. He said he was determined to experience what it takes to be successful, so after talking with a high school friend and a recruiter, he reported to basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, in February 2005.

 “The Air Force was the only branch I could think of that I wanted to join,” Oquendo said. “I didn’t see any other options, so I signed the dotted line to start my future.”

 Upon graduation, he was provided the sense of pride by becoming a member of the U.S. military.

 “I felt like most Marines feel when they graduate boot camp and earn the eagle, globe and anchor,” he said. “I felt like I was on top of the world.”

 The new airman checked into the Defense Information School at Fort Meade, Md., for training as a photographer. In July 2006, while stationed at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oquendo deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 “While in Qatar temporarily, Oquendo was assigned to photograph a visit by Maj. Gen. Anthony Przybyslawski, then commander of the Air Force Personnel Center. “He liked the photos so much he aske if I could accompany him through the rest of his tour,” Oquendo recalled.

 During the tour, Oquendo said, he saw Marine infantrymen conducting operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and had a feeling that something was missing in his life. He felt he wasn’t contributing enough to the global war on terrorism.

 “I knew what I really wanted to do, so I had to do whatever it took to achieve it,” he said.

 After building the courage, he talked to Przybyslawski about his ambitions and got the help he needed to make the transition from the Air Force to the Marine Corps.

 “I went to the administrative center to apply for separation forms, and the lady at the front desk thought I was crazy for filling it out after how long I’d been in,” Oquendo said. “Little did she know how committed I was to becoming a Marine.”

 Within two weeks, his separation request was approved and he left the Air Force on Nov. 1, 2006. Three weeks later, he stepped on the “Yellow Footprints” at Parris Island, S.C., with the ambition of becoming an infantry Marine.

 “Since I had been in the military for two years, it was kind of like cheating, because a lot of times were easier for me than the other recruits,” Oquendo said.

 He’s now deployed to Iraq for his second combat tour, this time with the Marine infantry, and he is as happy as ever.

 “I wanted to be an infantryman, because it’s the backbone of the Marine Corps,” he said. “It’s the stuff you read about in the history book making a difference in the world.”

 “When it comes to motivation, Oquendo bring it to a different level,” said Marine Corps Sgt. James D. Leach, a scout squad leader with Company D, 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion. “It’s good having him around.”

 (Marine Corps Cpl. Ryan Tomlinson serves with Regimental Combat Team 5.)

Leadership Book Garner’s more Praise

San Dimas, (CA) April 27, 2008, Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, a recent finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book Awards, continues to receive praise from readers.

 Andrew Borello, a reader noted on Amazon.com, “Wow…what a great book. As a consultant for career development and promotion, I read all the leadership materials I can get my hands on. The problem is, much of it is disappointing. It’s too long; too theoretical; too convoluted; or just plain boring. Harvey & Foster created a leadership encyclopedia of sorts that is packed with the essentials of leadership. This book has all the basics: Delegation, Decision Making, Teamwork, and many more, but it also has valuable details on important elements of leadership that other books often overlook: Consistency (important), Accountability (one of the biggest problems with new generation employees), and How to fail. This book is well written and detailed, but concise in that it won’t overwhelm the reader. It weaves the information through stories, definitions that are right on the money, great quotes, simple diagrams, and nice-to-know parallel information. This book serves as a great resource and will always be at an arm’s reach for years to come.”

 About the Book

Using card playing as analogy for leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, “You’re dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success.”

 About the Authors

Andrew Harvey served in law enforcement for 25 years, the last 12 as a captain with a Southern California police agency.  He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Cal State Los Angeles, and an educational doctorate in the field of organizational leadership from Pepperdine University.  He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the California POST Command College, the West Point Leadership Program, and is recognized in California as a master instructor.

 Dr. Andrew Harvey is an experienced college educator, currently serving as a professor at the University of Phoenix, and as a faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has been published numerous times in national and international publications.  He is a recognized expert in leadership and career development, and has served as an instructor in command leadership at the Los Angeles Police Department Academy.

 Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years.  He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant.  He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton.  He is has concluded the course work for his doctorate. Raymond is a graduate of the West Point Leadership program and has attended law enforcement, technology and leadership programs such as the National Institute for Justice, Technology Institute, Washington, DC.

 Raymond is currently a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and the Union Institute and University.  He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership.  Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One.  His first book, “Police Technology (Prentice Hall, July 2004)” is used in over 100 colleges and universities nationwide.   

 More Information:

www.pokerleadership.com

Police Books from Florida

April 22, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website added three law enforcement officials from Florida who have written books.

 In 1996, Robin Powell began her law enforcement career with the Broward County Sheriff’s Office (Florida) as a Detention Deputy Sheriff.  In 1999, she became a regular deputy sheriff, assigned to patrol.  After the birth of her daughter, she transferred to a civilian position as a Detention Program Specialist.  In 2006, she left the criminal justice field.  Robin Powell is the author of Girl Power: Saving Our Daughters Movement.

 According to the book description of Girl Power: Saving Our Daughters Movement, “In today’s society, young girls are faced with many challenging issues for example peer pressure, school safety, chatroom safety, personal safety, love of self, education and HIV/AIDS.  Many of these pressures draw girls to choosing the wrong paths. This book is an educational and empowering tool for young girls, parents, families, educators, coaches and many others.”

 Vern Thornton is a retired Chief Deputy from the Broward County Sheriff’s Office. In his retirement he founded Seniors Vs. Crime, in 1989.  Vern Thornton is the author of

Not Today Buster! and And Today is only Monday.

 According to the book description of And Today is only Monday, “Going back to the 1920s the book follows the life of a man in a small New England town as he gives up a secure government job to become a newspaper reporter, then an editor, with dramatic and often humorous accounts of events of the times. Hoodwinked into a new profession, this time in law enforcement, examine his career in Connecticut and Florida that followed.”

 Vincent Van Hasselt is a professor of psychology and director of the Interpersonal Violence Program at Nova Southeastern University (Florida).  He began his law enforcement career in 1995, when he joined the Plantation Police Department (Florida) as a part-time, certified police officer.  In addition to his academic career, he has worked in the criminal justice field as: an instructor at the Criminal Justice Institute, Broward County Police Academy (Florida); a consultant to the Major Crimes Unit of the Broward County Sheriff’s Office; lecturer and consult to the FBI Behavior Science Unit; and, to a variety of law enforcement related crisis response and negotiation teams. 

 Vincent Van Hasselt is the author of Handbook of Adolescent Psychopathology and he is a coauthor of Basic Interviewing: A Practical Guide for Counselors and Clinicians. 

 According to the book description of Basic Interviewing: A Practical Guide for Counselors and Clinicians, “This book offers clear and direct answers to the questions most frequently asked by students and trainees learning how to talk to clients and extract critical data from them. Its development reflects the old adage that “necessity is the mother of invention.” For many years, the editors taught beginning level mental health clinicians. They found, however, no text to be satisfactory–including a number that they themselves were involved in producing. Some were too difficult; some were too simplistic; some were too doctrinaire; still others had missing elements.”

 Police-Writers.com now hosts 984 police officers (representing 412 police departments) and their 2085 police books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Special Agent James O. Born

April 22, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The April 23, 2008, program of Conversations with Cops at The Watering Hole features a conversation with special agent and author James O. Born.

 Program Date: April 23, 2008

Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific

Topic: A conversation with James Born

Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

 About the Guest

James Born is a Special Agent with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. He has been involved in investigations such as organized crime, violent crimes, economic crimes, drug cartels, and police corruption.

 Before working with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, James Born joined the US Marshals service in early 1986 as a deputy marshal.  One year later, he transferred to the Drug Enforcement Administration. In four years with Drug Enforcement Administration, he was assigned to the West Palm Beach field office, and traveled within the United States and Panama. He spent a great deal of time in Miami during the height of the drug wars. His investigations at Drug Enforcement Administration generally focused on cocaine smuggling from Colombia. In addition, he worked undercover in a number of situations, in one case volunteering to assist the ATF as an undercover agent in the Ku Klux Klan during an explosives investigation. 

 James Born writes fictional novels set in Florida.  According to one reader, “It’s always exciting to pick up a novel by an author who started off with great work and who keeps getting better with each new book.  Born fits that description. Escape Clause, his third novel featuring Florida Department of Law Enforcement agent Bill Tasker, is easily his best, not an easy mark to reach considering the high quality of Walking Money and Shock Wave, his first two novels.”  James Born’s fourth novel is Field of Fire.

 About the Watering Hole

The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life.  Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

 About the Host

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years.  He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant.  He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University.  He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership.  Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One.  He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

 Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

 Program Contact Information

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA

editor@police-writers.com

909.599.7530

Praise for Villains

April 22, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.  The website also has separate listings for federal and international law enforcement officials.  One author listed, Dick Kirby, recently released his new book Villains.

 Dick Kirby was born in the East-End of London, England in 1943.  He joined the London Metropolitan Police in 1967.  Dick Kirby worked as a detective sergeant in east and north London and served on Scotland Yard’s Serious Crime Squad and the Flying Squad for half of his 26 years of service.  Throughout his career he was commended on 40 occasions for courage, leadership and his detective ability.  He retired from the police force in 1993.  Dick Kirby is the author of Rough Justice, The Real Sweeney, You’re Nicked and his most recent release Villains.

 Dirk Kirby’s latest book is received strong praise:

 “All of the stories are told with Dick Kirby’s acerbic, black humor in a compelling style by a detective who was there.”

American Police Beat, April 2008 edition.

 “ … a great collection of true stories that rival the best of the fictional yarn spinners.”

Joseph Wambaugh.

 “I’m a huge Dick Kirby fan … this is a fast-paced, riveting read, made even more enjoyable by Kirby’s trademark humor.”

Tangled Web Website, March 2008.

 “This is magic.  The artfulness of these anti-heroes has you pining for the good old days.”

The Daily Sport, 28 February 2008.

 According to the book description of Villains, “Police officers are now no longer encouraged to talk to criminals, and that’s a pity. Wonderful stories once were shared as a result of a quick pint with a snout down the pub, or as a respite during interrogation, when both copper and criminal would stop for a fag. Those were the glory days, where gripping accounts of slashings, fit-ups, dodgy deals, blaggings and petermen would filter through and become folklore. These days such intimacy is frowned upon (and smoking in interrogation cells is of course banned) so it is only here that these stories can be recounted. In Villains’ Tales the reader will be introduced to the bad, the mad and the dangerous to know, recounted in gripping style by those who had intimate dealings with the shady characters, both criminal and copper, from London’s underworld, long ago.”

 More information about Dick Kirby is available at www.police-writers.com/dick_kirby.html

 Police-Writers.com now hosts 981 police officers (representing 411 police departments) and their 2079 police books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.